Microbiology Course Catalog

Advanced concepts of molecular biotechnology; from cloning, sequencing, protein purification to therapeutics with a particular emphasis on design of experiments and interpretation of experimental data. This class will bring the student to reflect more broadly on experimental design and provide them with the necessary tools to answer common molecular biotechnology questions. This class will also introduce a journal club component where students will be encouraged to explore recent technological advances. By working in groups to analyze these articles, the student will also develop their communication skills and team-based presentations. Class discussions will touch on contemporary biotechnology questions, dilemma and ethics and will provide the student with various perspectives and help them sharpen their critical thinking. 
 
Semester(s) offered: Fall
Prerequisites: CHEM 261 or equivalent
Credits: 3

tbd

Semester(s) offered: Spring
Credits: 3

The main aspects of bacterial growth, including energy metabolism, biosynthesis of macromolecular precursor materials and their assembly into macromolecules, and the integration of these processes by various regulatory mechanisms. Emphasis on the isolation of mutant bacteria blocked in key cellular functions and on global control systems governing the adaptation of bacteria to different environmental conditions. Prerequisite: general background in microbiology and biochemistry.

Semester(s) offered: Fall
Prerequisites: General background in microbiology and biochemistry
Credits: 3

The Applied Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory (AMBL) is a requisite course for the MS concentration in Applied Molecular Biology. AMBL combines state-of-the-art laboratory training with independent research experience to train students in the latest techniques and concepts of molecular biology and biochemistry. Recombinant DNA technology is the primary focus of the first semester. Topics covered include nucleic acid isolation, genomics, quantitative PCR and RT-PCR, southern and northern blot analysis, and computational biological analyses. Protein expression, purification, and detection are the focus of the second semester. Topics covered include prokaryotic and eukaryotic protein expression systems, column chromatography, proteomics, western blot analysis, enzymatic assay, and microscopic analysis. Throughout the year-long course, students will develop critical thinking skills and gain valuable research experience, all while working on real world problems and preparing for careers in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.
Prerequisites: A bachelor's degree from an accredited four year college or university. Candidates must have demonstrated success in several of the following areas during their undergraduate studies including: genetics, biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, calculus, organic chemistry, physics, and statistics.

Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 5

This is a graduate lecture course designed to provide graduate students with a basic understanding of modern parasitology. Parasites are still an important threat to our global health and economy, and represent an important branch of infectious diseases. It has been stated that there are more kinds of parasites than free-living animals and plants, providing a wealth of biological diversity to study. Once thought of as strange and bizarre, parasites now serve as model organisms in which to study basic biological principles. The course covers a plethora of organisms and a multitude of disciplines. Our discussions will focus primarily on protozoan and metazoan parasites of major medical/veterinary consequence. Topics covered will include basic principles of parasitology, life cycles, host-parasite interactions, epidemiology, and medical treatments. The basic biology, biochemistry and genetics of selected parasites will also be discussed.

Semester(s) offered: Spring
Credits: 3

Fundamental and advanced topics in the molecular genetics of micro-organisms covered through lecture and discussion of the literature. Topics vary depending on the instructor. Prerequisites: basic coursework in biochemistry and genetics.

Semester(s) offered: Spring
Prerequisites: General background in biochemistry and molecular genetics
Credits: 3

Research project under direction of a faculty member.  By arrangement. A Microbiology Course Override Form is required for registration in Microbiology 696 - Independent Study.

Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1-8
Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1

A 10 week laboratory work participation. It will occur after the second semester of campus classes (summer). Students are required to actively work in a research or a production laboratory to gain hands on work experience. All work should include some responsibility. It is preferred that students work on a research projects. This can be fulfilled by a traditional internship at a company (paid), at an academic institution (unpaid) or by a full time career based job. Acceptable performance is evaluated by the supervising scientist. A final grade will be assigned by the program director. 

Semester(s) offered: Summer

A Microbiology Course Override Form is required for registration in Microbiology 699 – Master's Thesis.

Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1-9

Reports and discussion of pertinent literature and research. Required of all microbiology graduate majors each semester in residence. More information.

Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1

Research project under direction of a faculty member. By arrangement. A Microbiology Course Override Form is required for registration in Microbiology 796 – Independent Study.

Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1-8

Presentations an discussions of important microbial ecology research papers from the current literature. Fundamental questions in microbial ecology include: what are the drivers of community assembly? How do microbial functions scale? How does mass flow between species, and what factors regulate this? How can we predict or engineer community function? We will discuss microbial communities from a variety of natural and manufactured environments, with emphasis on new strategies to test hypothesis-driven microbial ecology research.

Semester(s) offered: Spring
Credits: 1

Critical review of the scientific literature is an integral part of scientific research, and both students and faculty benefit greatly from the discussions originating from these reviews. This well organized journal club entails critical review of the scientific literature deemed beneficial and relevant to both students and immunology faculty. Students make one presentation of a journal article from a reputable immunology-related journal with the advice and final approval from an immunology faculty member. Topics may include, but are not limited to molecular immunology, programmed cell death, virus immunology, infection and defense, cellular immunology and receptor-mediated signaling.

Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1

Explores through current primary literature some of the complex processes used by microbial pathogens to establish themselves in a host and to gain nutrients, subsequently causing host cell damage and disease, and to evade the host's defense. Includes discussion of the modern molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry tools to study these processes.

Semester(s) offered: Fall
Credits: 1
Semester(s) offered: Fall and Spring
Credits: 1-9